Category: Podcast

S2 Episode 23 – John Knox Village v COVID-19: “Learning Nuggets” from the Frontline

“When you’re faced with a crisis or a major challenge, you have a team and everyone on that team can contribute. The leader does not have to do it all themselves,” says Bill Pickhardt, COO of John Knox Village in Pompano, Florida. He shares this and other “learning nuggets” in an interview with Foresight Radio Producer Pam McDonald. Listen as they talk about the community’s experience with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about John Knox Village here.

S2 Episode 22 – The Treehouse Community Drives Innovation in Foster Care, Intergenerational Housing, and Vital Aging

Foresight Radio’s Host Pam McDonald interviews Judy Cockerton, a prime mover behind the Treehouse Foundation. She describes this housing community that serves former foster children, their adoptive families, and honorary grandparents. Judy wants to “bring this model to the entire country,” to push innovation in foster care, intergenerational housing, and vital aging. Learn more about the Treehouse Foundation at its website.

S2 Episode 21 – If You Have a Heart for Your People, You Can Be a Great Leader!


Our own Senior Living Foresight Publisher Steve Moran discusses his first book, Lead Don’t Manage, with Podcast Producer Pam McDonald. He provides practical leadership advice and says, “Life is just better for everybody when the people who are part of an organization love what they do. Good leaders wake up every day and say, ‘How can I make the best possible day for the team I’m leading?’ Then, it’s hard to go wrong.”
You can buy Steve’s book HERE.

S2 Episode 19 – If You Don’t Have This Technology, You Are Missing Out

Brian McWade, Connected Living’s CTO explains to Pam McDonald, Senior Living Foresight’s Podcast Producer how their enterprise engagement platform solves 3 of today’s critical senior living problems: lonely residents, worried families, and overwhelmed staff. With its 9 core solutions and 50+ featured programs, which can be purchased as needed, it is a one-stop tech shop. Learn more by visiting Connected Living’s website HERE.

S2 Episode 18 – Industry Thought Leaders Produce A White Paper for the “New Next” in Senior Living

Believing the pandemic gives senior living a do-over, thought leaders offer guidance for version2.0 in a White Paper titled Creating A Path Towards the ‘Next Normal’ in Senior Living. Senior Living FORESIGHT’s podcast producer Pam McDonald interviews Colin Milner, the founder and CEO of the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA), who organized the collaborative effort. You can download the white paper HERE.

S2 Episode 16 – Expressive Writing Course Helps Senior Living Residents Connect and Find Their Own Voice

Senior Living FORESIGHT team member, Fara Gold McLaughlin, interviews Angela Burton about the Feet to the Fire Writers Workshop Angela created for residents of senior living communities. “You don’t have to be a writer to participate,” she explains. “This is not a judged program. It’s not a critique program. We’re going to give you lots of permission and encouragement to write.” Learn more about the program at FeettotheFireWriters.com.

S2 Episode 15 – SLFORESIGHT Summit: Exploring the Tech Landscape

Gain Deeper Understanding of Senior Living Technology at FORESIGHT’S Virtual Tech Summit, August 11, 12, and 13
Senior Living FORESIGHT is offering a 3-day virtual technology summit – August 11, 12, and 13 – so industry leaders can explore adapted or purpose-build tech for the industry, as well as gain answers to their essential questions. FORESIGHT’s Podcast Producer Pam McDonald and Summit Producer Lola Rain introduce the event’s topics and presenters. Pam also interviews Sarah Thomas, strategic advisor with Akara Robotics, who describes the current landscape of robotics in senior living, and Andrew Smith who details the process Human Good used to implement labor management technology into its 21 life plan communities and nearly 100 affordable housing properties Register for the Summit here.

S2 Episode 13 – Ollie: Will This Destroy Age-Segregated Senior Living?

An objection sometimes heard from senior living prospects is: “I don’t want to live with just old people.” Ollie, a property developer and management startup based in New York City, is overcoming this complaint with co-living apartment buildings that are amenity- and service-rich, furnished, fully stocked, and staffed. Learn more from Ms. Ryan Murphy, associate director of marketing and communications, who detailed this “convenience living” option in an interview with Steve Moran, Senior Living FORESIGHT founder and podcast cohost.
If you want to listen to more podcasts from Senior Living Foresight, visit our podcast page.

S2 Episode 12 – ASHA Launches Campaign Spotlighting the Value of Senior Living

Media coverage of COVID-19 deaths may be unduly spreading fear among seniors and their families about how best to meet their long-term care needs. American Seniors Housing Association’s (ASHA) President David Schless describes the public relations initiative his organization has launched. He also urges communities to use their own or ASHA’s materials to tell authentic stories about the value of senior living, the many joyful everyday experiences of residents, and the differences between the various types of long-term care settings. To learn more about ASHA, visit their website.
If you want to listen to more podcasts from Senior Living Foresight, visit our podcast page.

S2 Episode 11 – Innovations Arise from the Pandemic

Innovations Arise from the Pandemic
While crises bring challenges, they also can uncover opportunities. In this episode, we’ll hear how the pandemic spurred innovation at two senior living companies. Heritage Communities’ Lacy Jungman describes the deepened commitment among residents, families, and staff to safeguard each other’s well being. And, Kisco Senior Living’s Randall Lonoza details their innovation to handle increased waste resulting from 100% resident room-delivered meals 3 times a day. Listen to the episode here.
If you want to listen to more podcasts from Senior Living Foresight, click here.

S2 Episode 10 – Massage, Reassuring Touch; It’s Everything

Massage, Reassuring Touch; It’s Everything
Cory Scurlock, Founder of The Massage Inc., a program that brings affordable, geriatric massage to senior living, describes the value of touch and the many benefits of the therapeutic practice of massage to Pam McDonald, Podcast Producer and Co-Host. Cory also provides instructions for several self-massage exercises. To learn more about Massage Inc, visit its website. Listen to the interview here.

For more podcasts from Senior Living Foresight, visit our podcast page HERE.

S2 Episode 9 – Pandemic Tales from the Frontline

 
Pandemic Tales from the Frontlines
Times of crisis bring challenges to overcome as well as chances to demonstrate one’s very best. Lori Alford, COO and a founder of Avanti Senior Living, tells Steve Moran, Senior Living Foresight’s Publisher, stories that demonstrate both. You can listen to the episode starting today at www.seniorlivingforesight.net/podcasts, and learn more about Avanti here.

Would You Go This Far to Protect Your Residents from COVID-19?

By Susan Saldibar
A couple of years from now, when you look back at this extraordinary period of time, what will you say about your role as a leader in your own community in fighting COVID-19? Will you be able to say that you did your best? Or will you struggle to respond?
Some will have no problem answering that question. These are the folks who have risen, without hesitation, to meet the challenges before them. We’re seeing heroes emerge every day on the front lines, going the extra mile to serve residents. And, yes, there are even executives stepping out of the (relative) calm of their offices to roll up their sleeves and do whatever it takes to protect their communities.
Isaac Scott is a good example of this. Isaac is CEO of Anthem Memory Care Communities, an Oregon-based operator of 11communities located throughout Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, and California. As a contractor with Anthem, I have spoken with Isaac in the past. So I know how seriously he takes the Anthem vow to “protect, engage, and love” their residents and staff (they were one of the first senior living communities to make sure they had onsite COVID-19 testing kits).
But the “protect” part was very much on display recently as Isaac did something that we see too little of in this industry: going outside the box to get things done. For Isaac, it meant hitting the road to make sure his caregivers and residents were as protected as possible from the deadly virus.
He took a road trip through Portland that would have been unthinkable a couple of months earlier.
In this case, the road trip involved a quest for hand sanitizers. A year ago, we might have laughed at that, right? But not in mid-March when most of us were scrounging around in purses and glove boxes for long-forgotten bottles of Purell. Not when your supplier puts all orders for hand sanitizer on “backorder” until mid-April. No laughing matter indeed. But, those who know Isaac know that he’s not the guy to sit around and wait. He would find an alternative. And find it fast.
Distilleries were just starting to get on board with re-calibrating their operations to produce supplies of hand sanitizers. Anthem’s VP of Operations, Shannon Gutierrez mentioned this to Isaac as a possible long shot. After some phone calls, he took to the streets of Portland to find a distiller willing to partner with him. And he found it in Shine Distillery and Grill.
From over a months’ delay to delivery in 5 days!
“It’s certainly unconventional, but when I connected with the distiller they were equally excited to create a product that helped our community staff,” said Isaac. “It was a team effort!” And it was one he thought to record in his journal, excerpts from March 21 and 24 below:

March 21st: Headed to downtown Portland to check in with a couple of distillers. Westward Whiskey was my first stop. They told me that they were not switching but to check with Eastside or Shine. Eastside was down the block but closed, so I called Shine and they said that they were the spot! Because they were quarantined, we negotiated the purchase over the phone. They were already making small bottles to sell/give out to Portland neighbors in their effort to support the community. We purchased 55-gallons as well as giving them a donation to support them continuing to offer free hand sanitizers to neighbors. A win-win-win for everyone.
March 24th: Picked up 55-gallons of hand sanitizer, boxed them up and shipped them out to each of our communities.

So, what would have taken over a month was delivered in less than 5 days!
A videolog tells the story.
The Anthem communities were so impressed with Isaac’s efforts that they asked if he would recount his travels. He did so, in a series of short videos which you can see below.
 
 
 
How will Isaac Scott look back on this scary, unprecedented period in the history of his Anthem Memory Care communities? He is characteristically optimistic about working through it together. “Although this period has been trying for us all, I am excited to be working in an industry that is looking at all ways to protect our residents and staff,” he said.
And he has a message to Anthem residents. “We’re not letting up. We’re here for you and will protect, engage, and love you through this tough time!”

S2 Episode 8 – The “Drama-Free Guy” Offers Help for Leading Your Teams Through Change

The novel Coronavirus has the staff of senior living communities facing unimagined challenges, procedures, and reactions. Dennis McIntee, a nationally known leadership expert, offers a variety of mindsets and approaches that leaders can use to guide their team members through this tsunami of change. To learn more about Dennis, who’s often called the “drama-free guy,” visit his website at Leadership Development Group.
Click HERE to listen to more podcasts from Senior Living Foresight.

One Day This Will All Be A Memory

By Kent Mulkey
 Most of our population has never lived through a global crisis like the current one. But there is a source of wisdom and reassurance for living through catastrophic times (like WWI, The Great Depression, recessions, WWII, polio epidemic, Vietnam War, Korean War, for some the Holocaust and now COVID-19) – the oldest people among us.  
My 92-year-old mom lived through and clearly remembers all the catastrophic events above. Yesterday I had a long conversation with her about COVID-19. She is taking all the important precautions, but she is not the least bit afraid – she has lived through some tough times.
 These are the people who are teaching us to take the long road through this time. With no intent to minimize it, this will all be a memory one day. And we will better, stronger, and more resilient people because of it. I heard a friend say the other day that the month of March felt like it lasted about 50 days. The month of March put a lot of things in perspective for me. Here is just one observation:
 People are kinder and more patient with each other. How do I know? I have not been honked at by an impatient driver even one time in the past month (true confession: I tend to drive a bit slower these days). I find myself calling friends and family and having open, tender, and heartfelt conversations. Not as though we are all going to die, but rather appreciating that we are alive and healthy.
Down the road, whenever this ends, I want to take with me all the lessons I can – slowing down, appreciating people, watching my health more closely, and anticipating that life will not always be easy. Tests and trials will come our way.
 As the upcoming Senior Living Foresight virtual summit says, we’re stronger together.
 Visit: seniorlivingforesight.net/2020virtualsummit
Register now and join hundreds of your colleagues in senior living!
 

S2 Episode 7 – Do You Know Your Likeability Score?

What if today’s workforce demands likeable bosses? Do you know your likeability score? Those are questions Steve Moran explores in his interview with Charn McAllister, Assistant Professor of Management and Organizational Development for Northeastern University’s School of Business. The research indicates that leader likability matters a lot – and can affect staffs’ job performance, turnover rates, and the company’s success.

S2 Episode 6 – Co-Location Projects Bring Affordable Housing Plus Community to Chicago’s Seniors

Chicago needs libraries, Chicago needs affordable senior housing — why not co-locate them? That idea is bringing housing plus community to Chicago’s low-income seniors. Details are revealed in interviews by Podcast Producer Pam McDonald with David Block, Director of Development and a Principal in Evergreen Real Estate Group, (www.evergreenreg.com) and Ann McKenzie, Chief Development Officer for the Chicago Housing Authority (www.thecha.org).
Click HERE for more podcasts from Senior Living Foresight.
 
 

Hospitals, Senior Living, and COVID-19

By Elizabeth George
Having enough hospital beds to treat COVID-19 patients in the event of a surge – that’s top of mind for healthcare professionals around the country right now.
Will we have enough hospital beds, enough healthcare professionals, enough life-saving medical equipment should we need it?
When there’s perceived scarcity of any kind, there are numerous types of responses – some more productive than others.
But with this shared national challenge is coming a new level of creativity and cooperation – even among former industry competitors – and it’s leading to break-through thinking and unconventional solutions.
One solution to the potential bed shortage, for example, is to identify nontraditional spaces – college dorms, former nursing homes, and empty buildings – to set up as temporary medical facilities. Plans being developed in New York for this solution require the deployment of the National Guard and partnering with developers and construction unions on getting facilities set up quickly.
States are also preparing to address a potential shortage of healthcare professionals – reaching out to retired doctors and nurses, seeking to get nursing students certified to work more quickly and asking for a relaxation of regulations that would allow doctors and nurses to work across state lines.
Outside the Box Solutions Ironically Come in a Box
One of the organizations being tapped for help during this challenge is RCare, a global provider of wireless nurse call and personal emergency response systems and a Senior Living Foresight partner. Hospitals are calling upon RCare to request the use of its Rapid Deployment Kit.
RCare’s Rapid Deployment Kit is a nurse call system in a box. True to its name, it’s able to be deployed quickly and is easy to operate, a necessity if patient volume rapidly expands.
“The overall risk from this virus is still unknown, but what we do know is that many hospitals and providers are being overwhelmed with patients,” said Myron Kowal, CEO of RCare. “It’s good to see the collaboration that’s taking place and we’re glad to be able to extend our technology capabilities to places in need.”
RCare developed the Rapid Deployment Kit approximately 10 years ago so it could assist in situations like the COVID-19 challenge we’re facing today. Says Myron Kowal, “Of course, we never want to have the types of challenges we’re facing now where we have to deploy tools like this. We’ve worked hard, however, to ensure that RCare can be ready when these challenges do arise.”
As we all get accustomed to a new reality – of social distancing, limiting access to our communities, and learning to live with the uncertainty it brings – we can all count on one thing: the ability and the “can do” spirit of the American people to wrestle a problem to the ground and identify creative solutions that make life better.
For information about RCare’s solutions, visit their website.

S2 Episode 5 – Staff Retention Secrets from A Carnival Barker

Download the audio
Cole Lindbergh had to hire 120 seasonal workers every year and was only able to accomplish this because he consistently got back of 80% of his team. Find out his secrets for staff retention and training in this podcast episode with Senior Living Foresight Publisher Steve Moran.

S2 Episode 3 – State Laws Say Marijuana’s Yeah; But the Feds Say, “No Way.” What’s A Senior Community to Do?

More states are decriminalizing possession of marijuana and its derivative products. But under federal law, businesses where marijuana is found are at risk for seizure of their assets. And, despite a myriad of claims, there is a near-universal lack of scientifically valid research demonstrating that marijuana can benefit seniors. In our latest podcast, retired Judge and drug court expert Peggy Hora examines considerations for senior living regarding marijuana use in its communities.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Why We Need Another Senior Living Association – Yes We Do!

By Steve Moran
While at the Residential Assisted Living Association national convention a few months ago, I had the chance to visit with Brian Pinkowski, the president of the association. My first question to him was why do we need another senior living trade association Because some would argue we already have too many associations.
By way of background, this association considers, for purposes of membership and constituency, any senior living community that has 1-19 beds to be residential assisted living.
Unique Challenges
Brian explained that residential assisted living communities have some very unique challenges that are not a factor for large communities. For instance, The Facility Guidelines Institute had a number of design standards that are adopted by health departments and those design standards were completely inappropriate for residential-style care homes.
One example: They were planning on adopting a guideline that would require every bedroom to have its own private bathroom. Their thinking was that it would make it so no one would need to go out to a corridor. It seems logical, but it doesn’t make sense in a residential-style home.
The Size of the Opportunity
As I talk to owners, operators and capital providers of large scale senior living communities about residential senior living, they largely see it as insignificant. I am not so sure. The association is collecting data on residential assisted living communities and here is what they have found:

They have looked at 42 states
There are more than 27,000 homes
This translates into what they estimate to be 300,000 or more bedrooms.

Take a look at this chart:

What It Means
When you look at the number of homes in California and Michigan and even Arizona compared with other states, it suggests a huge opportunity. One of the questions that remains unanswered is what impact, if any, it has on large senior living communities. There are, at least, these possibilities:

These communities are negatively impacting them.
They are serving a population that would otherwise do something else, meaning no impact.
They are expanding the awareness of senior living . . . of assisted living and making the market stronger.

The Big Challenges
I asked Brian about the biggest challenges these operators face. It is pretty similar to what large operators are facing:

Ageism, meaning people do not want them built in their neighborhood
Staffing
Occupancy

The Association
Today the association has 1,000 members, so they have more than 27,000 members to acquire. Unbelievably, you can as of the time this article is being written, join with a basic membership for FREE, which is a pretty good deal.
You can watch the whole interview here:

S2 Episode 2 – Consumers Want Wellness-Based Communities with Care, Not Care-based Communities with Wellness. Are You Making the Shift?


Consumers Want Wellness-Based Communities with Care, Not Care-based Communities with Wellness. Are You Making the Shift?
How you perceive the aging process impacts your health, quality of life, and probably how long you live. Thinking negatively about aging can steal as much as 7.6 years from your life. Colin Milner founded the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) nearly 2 decades ago to change the way we age, challenge our stereotypes about aging, and improve the quality of life for seniors. Discover the ways ICAA benefits senior living communities and society at large when older adults engage meaningfully in all aspects of life. Visit icaa.cc to learn more.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Have You Ever Wondered Why Anyone Would Open a Residential Assisted Living Community?

By Susan Saldibar
We’re hearing more these days about investment opportunities in residential assisted living. Organizations like Gene Guarino’s RAL Academy (a Senior Living Foresight partner) are providing education and connections into the industry for individuals (and, often couples) who real estate investors are looking for.
Gene recently shared with me the video portfolio of sessions from October’s RAL National Convention. One, in particular, grabbed my attention because it involved a panel of actual RAL investors with some good wisdom to share. And they were couples, which made it even more interesting. Each is part of, what Gene refers to as the Inside Circle; a group of individuals who have not only completed the RAL coursework but are active in the industry, remain involved in RAL Academy, and are successful in their own RAL businesses.
Three couples took the stage:

Mitch and Jennifer Conrad/Colorado with 7 care homes
Brad and Angie Jones/Texas with 1 care home and working on their second
Scott and Jenna Olson/Kansas with 4 care homes

What’s great is that their stories are diverse, and yet there is a common thread running between them: While they all liked the financial security of RAL property ownership, they found they ultimately got much more out of the experience from an emotional standpoint than they had ever anticipated. 
Case in point is Jennifer, who never thought she’d end up doing shift work on occasion in her own RAL. But she did. And, to her own surprise, she had a hard time giving it up. Mitch, on the other hand, is the self-proclaimed “investment guy” who found himself “not just supplying a home but rather supplying an experience”.
They all agreed that people are what really makes the difference in RAL ownership. “Find people who know how to do it,” Jenna tells the audience. “Seek out people who have talents in areas you don’t.” Brad agrees. “We’ve gone through lots of employees in 2 years, but our turnover rate has gone down from 20% to about 8%. It does take time to find the right kind of people,” he says.
The session quickly segued into a lively audience Q&A. You’ll want to download the entire session to get the maximum benefit of their collective wisdom. But here are a couple:

What was the biggest hurdle you faced and how did you overcome it?

For Mitch it was funding. “We got into our first house with a hard money loan to get started. That was easy,” he told the audience. But then when it came to re-financing, after they got the work done, they ran into challenges. As Mitch tells it, all the banks wanted at least two years of experience to get into an SBA loan. “I got 50 to 60 ‘nos’ from banks before I found someone who was willing to talk to us. So that was a huge hurdle for us.”
Angie struggled with deciding how “hands on” she wanted to be in their first RAL property. And it wasn’t easy. But she found that she was able to put her unique stamp on the property without getting sucked into the day-to-day operations. “It can still be ‘you’. It’s your brand; you can still be involved,” she said. “It’s a big hurdle to know when to let go, but you need to at some point,” she added.

Should you build from scratch or buy and develop?

Angie outlined some of the pros and cons. “In a perfect world we would build,” she said. And yet she acknowledges there are existing properties in desirable locations that are ripe for conversion. “Each deal will be unique. Just look at it and analyze the numbers from that perspective,” she says.
Brad stressed the importance of knowing your long-term and short-term goals. “If the short-term is to have cash to live on and operate the business, then it’s best to buy an existing business,” he said. “If you have a long-term goal for retirement, then it would make sense to buy an existing home and convert it, because you are going to buy that at a lower price than an existing home and business. The bigger profit will come when you sell it in the future.” Makes sense.

It May Be a Business, but the Human Side Comes Through
The only thing ending this energetic session was the clock (and the happy hour that followed). But it was a lively and connected group of people hungry to learn more from these couples who had made their RAL investment properties work, with valuable, full-to-capacity assets to show for it.
Throughout the session, the group kept coming back to the human aspect of the business. At one point Gene asked the couples what words of wisdom they had for others interested in getting into RAL ownership. Scott’s answer really drives home the emotional layer to this, one that’s not often taken into consideration. “Just keep your ‘why’ out front,” he tells the audience. “Not only what it is you want to accomplish, but don’t forget why you’re doing it.” 
You can get access to the RAL National Convention sessions here. For more information about RAL Academy, please visit their website.

S2 Episode 1 – These Mistakes Could End Your Construction Before It’s Begun

Building new, expanding, or remodeling senior living communities is extraordinarily expensive and fraught with lurking pitfalls. Missteps here can cost you millions or end the project before it begins. Jamie Timoteo, senior vice president of Plante Moran, a development advisory firm, warns against 7 of these potential oversights. Find more information at www.pmlivingforward.com.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Just Figuring It Out . . . Problem or Opportunity

By Steve Moran
One of the most fascinating conferences I attended this year was the Residential Assisted Living Association conference in Phoenix. I continue to believe the residential assisted living model is a growing segment of the senior living ecosystem and needs to be paid attention to.
While there I had the opportunity to interview Gene Guranio, the founder of the Residential Assisted Living Academy (a Senior Living Foresight partner) that ultimately birthed the Residential Assisted Living Association. Here is what he had to say:
And, oh by the way . . . you can join the association for free HERE.
The Beginning
I asked Gene how he got started down this path.
“I heard about it from a business perspective over 20 years ago when someone was sharing about how this can be a great way to help baby boomers in the future and at the same time make money. That was interesting but it wasn’t really until about 10 years ago when mom needed help that it became very real.”
He started looking for solutions and found a bunch of large senior living communities that felt more like a hotel than home and it was “not what mom wanted.” Gene started looking for a solution for mom, opened a six-bed assisted living community after which he knew that if it was something his mom wanted and liked there were going to be other people who wanted the same thing. That’s when he started teaching others how to do this.
Today
There were 650 attendees at the conference and many, maybe even most, are people who have not yet started their own residential assisted living community but are on the journey, and Gene and his team have taught thousands of people how to do this themselves.
Some of the folks Gene has trained have just one home and others have multiple. The level of interest in what he is teaching continues to grow.
Capital
Perhaps the biggest challenge those wanting to open residential assisted living communities is finding capital. They are working on an incubator concept that will make solving this problem a lot easier.
Room For Everyone
Gene would never suggest that residential assisted living will replace the more traditional large senior living community, it is just that it is not for everyone. He has this one area of expertise he is working on and thinking about all of the time.
You can watch the entire interview here:

S1 Episode 20 – Want Your Community’s Residents to Love Every Meal Every Day? Have Your Dining Staff Enhance Their Skills through the Senior Dining Association

When the room is full of top chefs, who could resist a culinary showdown? How about 3, including a mixology contest? No one – that’s what Harris Ader is willing to bet. He’s the founder of the Senior Dining Association, a professional development group that went from 0 to 420 members in just under 2 years. Listen to our podcast interview and discover the benefits this organization is bringing to dining/hospitality staff and our industry.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

S1 Episode 19 – The Green House Project: So Much More Than A House of a Different Color!

Senior Director Susan Ryan details The Green House Project’s ambitious 2.0 Initiative to return control, dignity, and a sense of well being to nursing home residents, families, and staff while maintaining high-quality and personalized care. She also describes their proven financially viable and sustainable small homes concept that is deinstitutionalizing and destigmatizing skilled nursing facilities.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

S1 Episode 18 – Not Much Happens Without Resident Involvement in Kendal Communities

At nonprofit, Quaker-based Kendal communities (www.kendal.org), residents are extensively involved in operations and programming. As a reflection of Quaker values, residents are encouraged to design their own lifestyle, share a sense of community, and collaborate respecting one another as equals. Our guest, Larry Elveru, director of communications and public relations, points out that residents have a seat on the community boards of directors, develop and lead activities programming, and create ties with nearby colleges and universities. Listen as Larry describes just a few of their resident-initiated endeavors.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

S1 Episode 17 – Insights from Lori La Bey: ‘The #1 Online Influencer about Alzheimer’s’

For over a decade, Lori La Bey has been educating the public about dementia and dementia care through her “Alzheimer’s Speaks” website, blog, and podcast, as well as through her writing and speaking across the nation. Oprah calls Lori “a health hero”. Marie Shriver says she’s an Architect of Change for Humanity, and Dr. Oz claims she’s the #1 Influencer Online about Alzheimer’s. We were pleased to have Lori as our guest for this podcast.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Lots of “BIG” Ideas About The “Small” Senior Housing Model

By Susan Saldibar
I admit, I’ve been super curious as to how the RAL National Convention, held a few weeks ago in Phoenix, went (RAL Academy is a Senior Living Foresight partner). I’ve been chatting with its president, Gene Guarino, over the last several months about his unique approach to RAL and the industry in general. So, I was eager to get his post-conference take on how it went. 
“It was exciting,” Gene tells me. “There was a sense from the over 600 attendees that we are at the right place at the right time. And plenty of industry people were there who are starting to get the idea that, for assisted living, the future is small.” And for Gene “small” refers to a “boutique” senior living option, the goal of which is to offer an alternative model to larger CCRCs and traditional AL communities. “Small is ‘peers’, versus ‘lost in the shuffle’,” as Gene likes to put it.
Honestly, I’d like to have gone myself. But here’s some good news for anyone else, like me, who couldn’t go but wish they had or are just interested in the model itself. Gene is making the recordings of the event and the expert presentations available to you. If you want to get access and experience it all first hand, you can click here to learn how you can get access to those recordings.
After talking with Gene about the conference I realize just how much ground it covered. Nothing was left out. A quick check of the program confirms that this was more than just a conference on RAL. I can see why it attracted so many individuals, from real estate investors to retiring boomers looking for an alternative investment model.  As for the conference sessions, here are just a few that jumped out at me: 

Keynote speakers: The keynote speakers were all nationally recognized experts, who collectively covered virtually all aspects of RAL as it relates to finance, law, and entrepreneurship. To name a few: Robert Kyiosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad, the #1 Financial Education book, Harry S. Dent Jr. The NY Times Best Selling Author of “The DemoGraphic Cliff” and “Zero Hour”; and Dr. Bill Thomas, whose “Eldertopia” concept I’ve written about before. Bill is the founder of The Green House Project, a non-profit, which you may have heard of. He’s since launched The Minka Project, a concept involving small prefabricated houses built for aging seniors and compact enough to fit on smaller property spaces. Many cities are now allowing these small prefabs to be installed in the backyards of residential homes to accommodate aging seniors who want some independence but also proximity to family. Really interesting concept that you can hear more about by watching the full session.
 

Finance/Funding: Not surprisingly, the conference put a pretty heavy focus on funding and financials. Sessions covered all aspects of where to find capital, how to grow profitably, and how to maximize rates of return. There were even some “outside the box” ideas from small to medium enterprises (SMEs) like Vern Harris and James Flint of A Better Way Realty. Other funding sessions included panels of financial advisors and lenders, including Mark Del Guercio of the Non Profit Advisor Group.
 

RAL Owners: There were plenty of owners at the conference. One session called “We Did It . . . And You Can Too!”, featured a panel of RAL owners and operators; regular people who have turned RAL into a profitable and emotionally satisfying business. 

These represent just a sliver of the 20+ sessions included in the conference. There is much more. And you can get access to those presentations here.
Oh, I almost forgot, Jonathan Goldsmith joined the fun at the Annual Awards banquet. If the name doesn’t ring a bell, you might know him better as the Dos Equis beer TV commercial’s “Most Interesting Man in the World”.  Jonathan provided the ultimate photo op. How I wish I could have gotten a selfie with him! Oh well. There’s always next year. 
To learn more about the RAL Academy you can visit their website.

S1 Episode 16 – Caring.com Partners with U. S. News and World Report to Create a Massive Online Assisted Living Directory


 
Seniors and their families searching the internet for support and guidance about assisted living communities are likely to find search results from a partnership between U. S. News and World Report and Caring.com. The two entities have compiled a digital directory of community-specific data, as well as reviews for nearly 9,000, assisted living communities nationwide. US News Reporter Ruben Castaneda shares some insights about the transition from home to senior living. And Ben Jackowitz describes partnership and assets shared by the two companies, including thousands of authentic consumers reviews drawn from Caring.com, a Senior Living Foresight partner and comprehensive resource for individuals looking for senior living and for providers looking to fill their communities. Additionally, for tips on decorating assisted living space in ways that can ease a transition, check out Ruben’s article here: https://health.usnews.com/best-assisted-living/slideshows/decorating-tips-for-assisted-living.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

S1 Episode 15 – A COO Moves into Her Communities

Would you be able to answer with a resounding YES to the question, would you move into one of your own communities? Well, Amy Birkel, COO of Heritage Communities based in Nebraska, would and has. In an experiment coordinated among the corporate . . .
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

S1 Episode 14 – Do You Have A CRM that Personalizes and Automates Your Marketing?

Imagine if your marketing and sales team knew where each prospect was in their decision-making journey. Imagine if your team could consistently follow up with relevant, personalized, next-step messaging. Well, thanks to innovative technology your hopeful vision can be reality now — automatically! Listen in as Lynn Madderra, VP of Ops for Continuum CRM, (a Senior Living Foresight partner), describes how you can integrate your prospect database with your marketing messaging to automatically move potential residents forward. As Lynn points out, with systems that “talk” to each other, you’ll be better able to deliver personalized, helpful messages at the right time.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Get Back to Basics with Operations — Could It Be That Simple?

With 25 years’ experience in senior living under his belt, operations expert and consultant Andrew Badoud believes it’s time to get back to basics — building better relationships. He says if you do the right thing, build trust and relationships with your customer and their families, and keep staff engaged that great things can happen. Listen in for a lot more takeaways when Podcast Producer and Co-Host Pam McDonald interviews her friend and former colleague. For more information about new development a

S1 Episode 13 – Get Back to Basics with Operations — Could It Be That Simple?

With 25 years’ experience in senior living under his belt, operations expert and consultant Andrew Badoud believes it’s time to get back to basics — building better relationships. He says if you do the right thing, build trust and relationships with your customer and their families, and keep staff engaged that great things can happen. Listen in for a lot more takeaways when Podcast Producer and Co-Host Pam McDonald interviews her friend and former colleague. For more information about new development acquisitions, turnaround management, sales and marketing, or operations assessments, contact Andrew at [email protected]
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Everyone Wins! Foster Kids in Senior Living

Rosemary Ramsey took her senior living background in a surprising direction, when she founded The Victory Lap, an intergenerational program that benefits both senior living communities and youth about to age out of foster care. She has piloted a program in Nashville, Tennessee, that gives 18- to 21-year-old foster youth a chance to avoid the worst challenges of leaving the foster care system — homelessness, unemployment, and a lack of connection to caring adults. Listen to Steve Moran’s interview with he

S1 Episode 12 – Everyone Wins! Foster Kids in Senior Living

Rosemary Ramsey took her senior living background in a surprising direction, when she founded The Victory Lap, an intergenerational program that benefits both senior living communities and youth about to age out of foster care. She has piloted a program in Nashville, Tennessee, that gives 18- to 21-year-old foster youth a chance to avoid the worst challenges of leaving the foster care system — homelessness, unemployment, and a lack of connection to caring adults. Listen to Steve Moran’s interview with her here.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

A Senior Living “Comm-University”: A Marketing Coup and A Win-Win-Win-Win for All Involved

The “Comm-University” at Pacifica Senior Living in Healdsburg, California, is a program that exemplifies competitive differentiation at its best. It enables the community to forego conventional marketing yet sustain 100% occupancy with a waiting list. But even more than that, it enhances residents’ sense of purpose and joy, connects children in meaningful ways with elders, solidifies relationships with residents’ families, and is a source of pride for management and staff. Listen as program coordina

S1 Episode 11 – A Senior Living “Comm-University”: A Marketing Coup and A Win-Win-Win-Win for All Involved

The “Comm-University” at Pacifica Senior Living in Healdsburg, California, is a program that exemplifies competitive differentiation at its best. It enables the community to forego conventional marketing yet sustain 100% occupancy with a waiting list. But even more than that, it enhances residents’ sense of purpose and joy, connects children in meaningful ways with elders, solidifies relationships with residents’ families, and is a source of pride for management and staff. Listen as program coordinators Tony Fisher and Julia Agee detail how it’s done.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

A 6-Bed Affordable Senior Living Model that Makes A Profit?

One person said, “This rescued me from seclusion”.
The following is an edited version of a conversation between Senior Housing Forum Publisher and Podcast Co-Host Steve Moran and Garden Spot Communities CEO Steve Lindsey about its “Grand Experiment” into affordable senior living. Listen to the Podcast HERE.

Moran: Steve Moran here with Senior Housing Forum and I am at the Environments for Aging Conference in Salt Lake City. Today I am talking to Steve Lindsey, who is the CEO of . . .
LINDSEY: Garden Spot Communities.
Moran: Okay, tell me a little bit about Garden Spot Communities, who you are, where you’re at, and what you do. So, let’s start with that and then we’re going to dig into the really cool thing I want to talk about.
LINDSEY: Okay, great. Yeah. Garden Spot Communities is a life plan community located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have two locations: our main location in New Holland has about a thousand residents and is spread over a couple of hundred acres. And then we have a smaller site about 10 miles away. We’re affiliated with the Mennonite Church not-for-profit organization.
Moran: How old?
LINDSEY: Coming up on 25 years.
Moran: Cool. Cool. So, uh, you’re actually here today this time at Environment in Aging . . . You actually did a presentation because you have done this really cool sort of single-family, small home, low-income thing. So why don’t you tell me a little bit . . .
Their Grand Experiment into an Affordable Co-Living Home
LINDSEY: This is a project that we’ve really been excited about. It’s something that we’ve kind of called our Grand Experiment over the last couple of years. We refer to it as cooperative living or a co-living model for older adults. We’ve been able to develop it in a way so that it is accessible for people regardless of income. The people who live there are on a month-to-month rental basis and they are on a sliding scale fee, 30% of income – no matter how low that income might be.
Moran: So, in terms of what it actually . . . what you’re actually seeing right now, what are they typically paying?
LINDSEY: Oh, anywhere from $150 a month up to $250, $300 a month.
Moran: Okay. And this is a house?
LINDSEY: It is a house.
Moran: So, sort of describe the physical environment to start with.
LINDSEY: Sure, well, yeah, it’s a residential scale home a little north of 3,000 square feet. It’s got five bedrooms, five-and-a-half baths, and the way it functions is similar to a co-living model. The people who live there have their own bedroom suite. So, the bedroom, bathrooms, and some storage area, that’s all private space and then they share the rest of the house together.
Privacy Plus Life “in Community”
And we think the beauty of that is that you have the privacy you want, but you also have interaction with other people. And one of the things we’ve heard from people who move in is they were living in isolation. One person said, “This rescued me from seclusion” before they moved in. And so that opportunity to be “in community”, to be in relationship with other people once again just has enormous impacts on not only someone’s emotional wellbeing and their social life, but also their physical health.
Moran: So, how do . . . do you provide any services, do you provide the food service, or did they do that themselves or do they cook together or how does that work?
LINDSEY: This is very much an independent living model, and they live in the house together. They do the chores, they do the cooking, they do the cleaning. We do provide building maintenance. We provide grounds maintenance, upkeep, snow removal, and all the utilities are included, Wifi, heating, air conditioning. All those sorts of things, trash removal.
And then we also have a social worker-case manager who works with the folks in the house just to make sure that they’re getting access to the services that they’re eligible for and making good use of the money that they do have. But then also just kind of assimilation into the house. And should there be any disruption of life there. We all know from our own families that there are times things go really well, and you’re really tight-knit and there are other times there’s just a little bit of friction. So, we fully expect to see that in a house like this as well and the social worker’s available just to go in and help to resolve those issues or mediate.
Moran: So how long has it been open?
Almost A Year’s History Behind Them
LINDSEY: It’s been open, uh, about nine months at this point and so, we’ve got a little bit of history behind us. We’re continuing to work with the group there and just understand the way life happens.
Moran: And so, you . . . have you had any big conflicts and how have you worked that out? And, sort of related to that, how did you make sure as you were selecting the residents, because I would assume you had more people than . . . who wanted to move in than you had space for, how did you make sure they were compatible?
LINDSEY: Yeah, well the beauty of the model is that it’s not dependent on any government funds. There’s no government subsidy that goes into it. And so that gives you the freedom to serve the local community. The people moving in aren’t on a county list somewhere and it’s next one up that gets placed in the house. So, we have a chance to do some screening for people who move in.
We place a priority on the lowest income individuals, but then there’s also that ability to fit with the rest of the group, that ability to integrate socially with the other folks in the house. So, we do have some screening that we go through, looking at income levels and looking at a few other factors, but then there’s an interview process. Ultimately the people who are living in the house have a chance to interview, to meet with that person, and they get the last say on who moves in or doesn’t move in.
Moran: So, have you had any turnover yet?
LINDSEY: We have had a couple of folks turned over. We had one person who lived there who had a significant medical issue and needed to move out, so we have had that kind of replacement of persons as it’s gone along.
Living “In Community”, People Keep An Eye on Each Other
Moran: What do you . . . so these are all seniors . . . over age 65, 62 . . .
LINDSEY: 62 and over . . .
Moran: As they age, and they start having increased physical, maybe cognitive issues, how do you expect to deal with that?
LINDSEY: Yeah. Well, one of the nice aspects of the house right now is that the people kind of look after each other. There’s that element of someone else is kind of keeping an eye to make sure you took the pills this morning, you know. Or, “Don’t you have a doctor’s appointment today? You need to make sure you get to that.” Or, “Do you need a ride to the doctor’s appointment?” kind of thing.
So, there’s that life “in community” that we think is going to have a significant impact on keeping people healthier longer. When people do need assistance, the opportunity to bring services in through home care or home health or whatever it might be is certainly available to the folks there.
We think that they’re going to be able to stay in that residence up through the personal care or assisted living level with services being brought in. And then, when they do need skilled care, we will assist them in finding an appropriate setting for them.
Moran: And when they need skilled care, the economics, at least theoretically, become a little bit easier because you’ve got Medicaid.
Or so, so, five residents, um, hundreds of thousands or millions of people who potentially need this level of care. This is like not even a drop in the bucket, right?
LINDSEY: Exactly, exactly.
Scaling the Project
Moran: So, what can the operators learn and how do you see the scaling, or do you?
LINDSEY: Well, I think there is opportunity . . . and one of the questions we’ve gotten is why five? Why only five? And for us, it was a couple of issues. First of all, we wanted to prototype it. We had not been able to find any similar models that existed targeting that socio-economic group. And, the opportunity to prototype something, to make sure it works, to refit it without a huge financial investment was significant for us. Um, so that was one.
The other is we wanted to create a model that would fit into a residential neighborhood. The location of the prototype model is right across the street from our existing campus. We have an opportunity there to do maybe five homes at that location, but then the larger plan is to move it out into the larger community.
This idea is that you could place a house in a residential community so people could stay in their neighborhood close to their social network. You know, their church, their family, friends, that sort of thing, but still have safe, effective, high-quality housing. So, we envision a network of these homes around their larger community.
But there’s also an opportunity, I believe, to, to put this into a multistory building. And if you look at some of the models of co-living that target millennials, that’s exactly what they’re doing. They’re building a hundred units, 150 units, multi-story and each level going up through provides kind of a co-living house. And then common space, you know, together on the first floor.
And I believe that there’s an opportunity to do that. It might be going in an urban renewal effort, taking an existing building and retrofitting that without a huge financial investment. And it could target that age group just as well.
Moran: Does it break even?
LINDSEY: It does. Yeah definitely. That’s the exciting part. And that’s one of the things we wanted to check out.
Moran: So, let’s talk about the . . . how did you pay for the building of it, first, and let’s talk about operations.
The Key to Success — Keeping Construction Costs Down
LINDSEY: Yeah. We went into it realizing that the key to success without using any government subsidy was going to be the ability to keep the cost of construction down. And what we did was to take this vision out to the larger community and solicit input and help. And we positioned it, not as a Garden Spot Communities’ effort, but as we were taking the lead in having a conversation.
And so, we coalesced a kind of a support network in churches and social, civic groups and schools and so forth to come together. And we said this is an opportunity for us as a community to make a difference in our community. We had a steering team that was made up of community members.
And then when we went out and started construction, we really relied on a lot of volunteer construction effort. We solicited people in churches and civic groups. When the first day that we placed walls in place, it was a local college, Franklin and Marshall College, [that] sent their incoming freshmen, a group of their incoming freshmen as part of their freshman orientation process over to help build this house.
Moran: Well, that’s cool. Yeah. So, it’s a little bit like the Habitat for Humanity model.
LINDSEY: Yeah, absolutely. And that opportunity for folks to come together to have an investment, to have a heart in the development was really significant for us and kept the construction costs at a reasonable level so that we were able to make it financially viable.
Keeping Operational Costs to a Minimum
Moran: . . . And then talk to me about operational costs.
LINDSEY: Yeah, operational costs are minimal. Like I said, we have a social worker who dedicates a portion of her time to this. Our maintenance guys will go over and repair things or update things. Our grounds crew does the snow removal or mowing the lawn and that, and utilities really comprise the operational cost. So, it is minimal because it’s an independent living model. You know, it’s not assisted living, it’s not another level of care. So, it’s targeted at housing.
Moran: And so, do . . . the things like the social worker and the maintenance and the snow cleaning, those kinds of things, do you charge that back to that particular project or is that something you absorb as part of your mission?
LINDSEY: No, we felt that especially as we went into this, that we wanted to do a real financial accounting of what the actual costs are. So, we do allocate all of those costs to the cooperative living house and we’re able to keep track. And, the good news as I mentioned, is it does pencil out. It’s in the black and we’re really excited about it.
Increased Pride and Staff Engagement
Moran: Well this is really cool because to me it seems like the kind of thing that whether for profit or not for profit, it’s sort of mission driven. And I could see it, because I’m so focused on work culture, I could see how team members would really get behind supporting something like this and feel proud of an organization that does that. Are you going to do another one?
LINDSEY: Yes. Yeah, absolutely. We are committed after doing the first one. We wanted to take a full year and just kind of learn from it. And so, as we come up on the conclusion of that first year, we know there’s some tweaks we want to make to the building. We know there’s some other things that we can do to make it more livable. We’ve gotten that feedback from the people who live there.
We’ve already started the land development process for the next phase and so we will move into that. And, uh, we’re just excited. We realized five people, as you said, it’s not a drop in the bucket . . .
Moran: . . . except for those five people.
LINDSEY: It makes a huge difference in the lives of those five people. But, I don’t think there’s any magic bullet that’s going to solve all the issues. But one of the things we’re convinced of is that the government is not currently keeping up with the demand for low-income, affordable housing. And as we approach this age wave, we don’t think they’re going to be able to keep up in the future.
So, it’s going to take a lot of organizations, a lot of communities thinking creatively about how they meet the needs in their own community and how they do things a little bit differently in order to make the difference. So, if this is something that others can replicate, that’s fantastic. If it’s just an inspiration for them to go and do something new, that’s even better. I think we can work hard. We can lean in. We can innovate and make a difference.
Moran: Well, Steve, thank you very much.

A 6-Bed Affordable Senior Living Model that Makes A Profit?

Given that so many seniors can’t afford the average $2,000 to $5,000 per month cost of traditional senior living, Senior Housing Forum — The Podcast seeks to feature as many successful models as we find. In this episode, Garden Spot Communities’ CEO Steve Lindsey describes how they put together their affordable senior co-living home in New Holland, Pennsylvania. Visit https://www.gardenspotvillage.org/ for more information.

S1 Episode 10 – A 6-Bed Affordable Senior Living Model that Makes A Profit?

Given that so many seniors can’t afford the average $2,000 to $5,000 per month cost of traditional senior living, Senior Housing Forum — The Podcast seeks to feature as many successful models as we find. In this episode, Garden Spot Communities’ CEO Steve Lindsey describes how they put together their affordable senior co-living home in New Holland, Pennsylvania. Visit https://www.gardenspotvillage.org/ for more information.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Sing-alongs with a Twist Bring Residents Greater Engagement and Quality of Life

Listen in and discover how Songs by Heart — a twist on sing-along programs — enhances resident engagement and quality of life. Podcast Producer and Co-Host Pam McDonald interviews Jenny Cook, a board-certified music therapist with the Songs by Heart Foundation, to learn how the program works and benefits residents as well as their families. Pam then interviews Annette DeCamp, Program Manager for The Kenwood by Senior Star in Cincinnati, Ohio, where Song by Heart is a big part of the activities they offe

S1 Episode 9 – Sing-alongs with a Twist Bring Residents Greater Engagement and Quality of Life

Listen in and discover how Songs by Heart — a twist on sing-along programs — enhances resident engagement and quality of life. Podcast Producer and Co-Host Pam McDonald interviews Jenny Cook, a board-certified music therapist with the Songs by Heart Foundation, to learn how the program works and benefits residents as well as their families. Pam then interviews Annette DeCamp, Program Manager for The Kenwood by Senior Star in Cincinnati, Ohio, where Song by Heart is a big part of the activities they offer. Annette describes why she’s such a huge fan of Songs by Heart.
More information about Songs by Heart can be found at http://www.songsbyheart.org, and about The Kenwood at https://www.seniorstar.com/kenwood.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 8 – Ode to Joy

The gauntlet has been thrown down: senior living operators have been challenged to maximize their residents’ opportunities for joy — especially given its immense value and benefits. In this episode, SHF Publisher Steve Moran interviews Ingrid Fetell Lee, researcher, designer, and author of JOYFUL: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness. Listen in and discover what joy contributes to individual happiness as well as how to create it, especially through environmental surro

S1 Episode 8 – Ode to Joy

The gauntlet has been thrown down: senior living operators have been challenged to maximize their residents’ opportunities for joy — especially given its immense value and benefits. In this episode, SHF Publisher Steve Moran interviews Ingrid Fetell Lee, researcher, designer, and author of JOYFUL: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness. Listen in and discover what joy contributes to individual happiness as well as how to create it, especially through environmental surroundings. You can read more from Ingrid Lee on her website AestheticsofJoy.com.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 7 – Taking Exceptional Resident Photos

Tom Sanders is a professional photographer and filmmaker with over 15 years’ experience who focuses on capturing portraits of elder — grabbing our attention and suggesting a wealth of experience in their eyes. Tom has two coffee table, photo-essay books published, one spotlighting World War II veterans, the other, Vietnam Veterans. Here he shares some tips for getting the best photos of your residents. You can see his work at www.tomsandersphotos.com.

S1 Episode 7 – Taking Exceptional Resident Photos

Tom Sanders is a professional photographer and filmmaker with over 15 years’ experience who focuses on capturing portraits of elder — grabbing our attention and suggesting a wealth of experience in their eyes. Tom has two coffee table, photo-essay books published, one spotlighting World War II veterans, the other, Vietnam Veterans. Here he shares some tips for getting the best photos of your residents. You can see his work at www.tomsandersphoto.com.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 6 – Accountability, Part II

In Part 2 of this episode, we continue our conversation about accountability with culture guru Denise Boudreau-Scott, found and president of Drive. Here she relates a personal story that exemplified how a positive company culture works. And, she describes her secret dream for senior living’s future in which it embodies its values. For more information, contact Denise at [email protected]

S1 Episode 6 – Accountability, Part II

In Part 2 of this episode, we continue our conversation about accountability with culture guru Denise Boudreau-Scott, found and president of Drive. Here she relates a personal story that exemplified how a positive company culture works. And, she describes her secret dream for senior living’s future in which it embodies its values. For more information, contact Denise at [email protected] Listen to part one here.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 6 – Accountability, Part I

In Part 1 of this episode Podcast Cohost Pam McDonald and Denise Boudreau-Scott discuss accountability – why it matters in senior living, what it looks like, and how to achieve it by creating positive company culture. Denise is founder and president of Drive, a consulting and coaching firm that assist senior living and healthcare organizations to create favorable business outcomes through powerful culture. For more information, contact Denise at [email protected]

S1 Episode 6 – Accountability, Part I


In Part 1 of this episode Podcast Cohost Pam McDonald and Denise Boudreau-Scott discuss accountability – why it matters in senior living, what it looks like, and how to achieve it by creating positive company culture. Denise is founder and president of Drive, a consulting and coaching firm that assist senior living and healthcare organizations to create favorable business outcomes through powerful culture. For more information, contact Denise at [email protected] Listen to part two here.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 5 – Life Stories in Dementia Care

Dementia care expert Nancy Schier-Anzelmo reveals a “recipe” for providing exceptional care to those in senior living with Alzheimer’s or other dementia. Nancy is a gerontologist, college instructor, highly sought speaker, and principal in the consulting firm, Alzheimer’s Care Associates, LLC. Contact her at [email protected]

S1 Episode 5 – Life Stories in Dementia Care

Dementia care expert Nancy Schier-Anzelmo reveals a “recipe” for providing exceptional care to those in senior living with Alzheimer’s or other dementia. Nancy is a gerontologist, college instructor, highly sought speaker, and principal in the consulting firm, Alzheimer’s Care Associates, LLC. Contact her at [email protected]
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 4, Part II

In this episode, we continue our interview with senior living sales superstar Paul Peck, who shares his best recommendations for improving occupancy. Here he details the how-to for calculating the numbers needed to reach sales goals, as well as spotlights the metrics to track to keep the sales team focused and motivated.

S1 Episode 4, Part II

In this episode, we continue our interview with senior living sales superstar Paul Peck, who shares his best recommendations for improving occupancy. Here he details the how-to for calculating the numbers needed to reach sales goals, as well as spotlights the metrics to track to keep the sales team focused and motivated. Listen to part one here.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 4, Part I

In this interview, presented in 2 parts, sales leader Paul Peck details his method for getting to 90% occupancy and beyond. A regional sales director with Pacifica Senior Living and over 15 years’ experience, Paul has guided numerous communities to achieving and sustaining 100% occupancy. In Part 1, he shares his secret sauce – empowering the Executive Director to head the sales team.

S1 Episode 4, Part I

In this interview, presented in 2 parts, sales leader Paul Peck details his method for getting to 90% occupancy and beyond. A regional sales director with Pacifica Senior Living and over 15 years’ experience, Paul has guided numerous communities to achieving and sustaining 100% occupancy. In Part 1, he shares his secret sauce – empowering the Executive Director to head the sales team. Listen to part two here.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 3

Episode 3: More often these days we hear that ours is an industry ripe for disruption. This episode presents two interviews we hope inform your thinking about changes you may want to make in what you offer to attract and serve Boomers and succeeding generations. For more information about our speakers, visit https://chipconley.com/modern-elder-academy and https://alzcareassociates.com.

S1 Episode 3

Episode 3: More often these days we hear that ours is an industry ripe for disruption. This episode presents two interviews we hope to inform your thinking about changes you may want to make in what you offer to attract and serve Boomers and succeeding generations. For more information about our speakers, visit https://chipconley.com/modern-elder-academy and https://alzcareassociates.com.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 2

Episode 2: Get lots of info and some practical tips for using social media for marketing your community from Tech Writer Susan Saldibar in our “Best Practices for Best Results” segment. Check out her Facebook page, Susan Saldibar Marketing Services. Free up more of your time by detoxing from your Smartphone; learn how in “Hacks for EDs”. Ready to pull the trigger on your own mentorship program to take your burgeoning leaders to new levels. Steve Moran explains how in “To the C-Suite”. And, our sponsor Touch

S1 Episode 2

Episode 2: Get lots of info and some practical tips for using social media for marketing your community from Tech Writer Susan Saldibar in our “Best Practices for Best Results” segment. Check out her Facebook page, Susan Saldibar Marketing Services. Free up more of your time by detoxing from your Smartphone; learn how in “Hacks for EDs”. Ready to pull the trigger on your own mentorship program to take your burgeoning leaders to new levels. Steve Moran explains how in “To the C-Suite”. And, our sponsor TouchTown (www.TouchTown.com) introduces its new virtual tour feature.
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Episode 1

Episode 1:”Best Practices for Best Results” features Wendy D’Alessandro who discusses making the most of PR in senior living. She’s a writer and thought leader on the Senior Housing Forum team with over 18 years’ experience. www.lynnpr.com
“Hacks for EDs” warns against focusing on busyness at the expense of results.
And, in “A Deeper Dive”, we take another look at a story posted on the Forum in May 2018. Cassie McDonagh, Regional Life Enrich

S1 Episode 1 – Best Practices for Best Results

Episode 1: “Best Practices for Best Results” features Wendy D’Alessandro who discusses making the most of PR in senior living. She’s a writer and thought leader on the Senior Living Foresight team with over 18 years’ experience. www.lynnpr.com
“Hacks for EDs” warns against focusing on busyness at the expense of results.
And, in “A Deeper Dive”, we take another look at a story posted on the Forum in May 2018. Cassie McDonagh, Regional Life Enrichment Director with StoryPoint/Independence Villages in Michigan, details the results of their “Cookie Madness” contest, a highly successful resident activity that spread awareness and goodwill.
Senior Housing Forum – The Podcast is sponsored TouchTown (https://www1.touchtown.us/).
Click HERE for more from the Senior Living Foresight Podcast.

Senior Housing Forum – The Podcast Launching Soon

Senior Housing Forum, the industry blog you read daily, is proud to announce our podcast will debut on Wednesday, January 16. Our podcast will be co-hosted by Steve Moran and Pam McDonald.

Steve Moran at McKnights: Managing the physician relationship in senior communities

Here is my question: Do your house physicians manage you or you them?
Here is my question:  Do your house physicians manage you or you them?
Recently, McKnight’s Long-Term Care News published an article on the use of antipsychotics in nursing homes. The essence of the article is that CMS partnered with the American Health Care Associations Quality Initiative (AHCAQI) in an effort to effect a 15% reduction in antipsychotic drug use in nursing homes by the end of the 2012. The data demonstrates they did not come close to meeting that goal. It appears the principal reason for this failure is because physicians continue to prescribe them. AHCAQI is now calling for CMS to put more pressure on physicians to reduce antipsychotics.
Read the rest of the article here

“Hell Yes!” or “Hell No!”

I have a question to ask you and I want your gut reaction. No over-analyzing allowed!   Would you choose to live in your nursing home or assisted living?   What was your answer” Was it a sheepish “yes” . . . mostly because you felt like you had to say it?  Or maybe an honest, “Never!” Now, let me ask you this . . . Did you feel like answering the question by shouting, “HELL YES!”? Somehow I doubt it. And I sort of think that stinks! I get it. I know it’s not realistic to think that you would get so excited to live in your nursing home or assisted living that you would yell “HELL YES!” But stop for a minute and think. What if this statement was your filter for leading your organization? What if you asked yourself before any project or decision, “Is this going to support us being a “HELL YES” community?” When we think about making such a drastic change as creating a community people actually WANT to live in, most of us react in one of two ways. Either:

We become overwhelmed and do nothing. We have no idea where to start or what the next step should be. It’s all too much to think about so we give up before we even begin! Or
We start implementing programs fast and furiously.  One new program followed by another. They might be great ideas, but without a foundation of engaged staff members they quickly fall apart.

But….there is another choice!

One simple approach that can help you actually move to a “Hell Yes!” community in no time. If it isn’t a HELL YES…then it’s a no. Focus on people before programs! That one shift in your approach to any and all programs you try to implement will make all the difference! It will allow you to inspire, rather than force change. It will motivate your staff to want to improve, rather than force them to comply. It will have people thinking on their feet, rather than running to you for every problem. Focusing on staff and engaging them in their work creates a culture in which they in turn engage residents. And that will make all the difference in how your residents experience life at your community. Not how they are cared for or how they are served. But how they are living! Because being “cared for” and “served” are nice…but they don’t create an experience worthy of a “HELL YES!”  So many people talk about the importance of the patient or resident experience, yet very few are actually doing anything about it. Maybe some of your ideas don’t seem realistic. And they certainly won’t be easy to implement. Know that the effort is worth it. For you, for your staff, and for your residents. I’m not sure if you are a person who you does not know where to start or if you’re busy making lots of changes. Maybe you’re one of those just taking it slow and steady. But here is what I am sure of… YOU have the ability to change lives. YOU know what is right. YOU know it can be different. YOU are unrealistic and because of it YOU will change the world of long-term care. Being honored, respected, encouraged, challenged, supported…and yes a bit pampered…those make ME want to scream, “HELL YES!” So what about you? What would it take for you to yell, “HELL YES” when asked about living in your community? Let me know in the comments below! Enjoy what you read and want to see more like it? Sign up for my free updates here!

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